In the jungle

On the map, the public footpath along the north bank of Linley Brook, east of Linley Bridge, looks inviting. When we tried to access it a few weeks ago, we encountered thickets of brambles and, unable to see a path, gave up. When I heard, earlier today, that the obstruction had been cleared, I decided we ought to try again.

As we’d hoped, there was little difficulty today in starting along the way, and the path looked usable. At times it’s close to the brook, which runs here in a mini-gorge on a rocky bed – beautiful! However, it became increasingly clear that we were the only two-legged users of the path for some time, and eventually it seemed to peter out as more brambles gathered. We might be able to continue in the field just beyond the jungle – let’s try it. Yes, sure enough, there are the waymarkers – we’ve made it, and we’re soon back to civilisation! A most interesting and enjoyable exploration, but emphatically not to be attempted in shorts…

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Stanley Lane and the old railway

A (not very) circular walk on a cold grey afternoon – got to keep moving to stay warm! Down Stanley Lane and across to the old railway trackbed, which we follow northwards for a couple of miles. then back up through the trees to Colemore Green. Between here and the car, the fields are sunshine yellow – it’s that time of year again.

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A clear blue sky…

… with a few puffy white clouds to break the monotony!. The sunshine’s warm but the air’s very cold – more like January than April! The brisk northerly breeze doesn’t help, though this route is fairly well sheltered, and despite the cold, the year’s first bluebells are beginning to bloom. There will be warmer days!

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Mogg Forest and The Ditches

The Ditches: an ancient hill fort, well hidden in the depths of Mogg Forest. If this was grassland, it would be a spectacular landmark. It would probably be much more popular too. On this glorious Easter Sunday we passed one other walker (the weatherman says we’re going to pay for it tomorrow, when the temperature will probably be 10°C cooler…)

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Across the fields

It’s that Shirlett round again. Much has changed since we walked this way in February – white blossom, violets, leaves appearing on the trees (and it’s much drier underfoot!). As expected, it’s quiet – though we did meet one other person on the stretch across the fields (after I’d commented that we’d never met anyone else on that part of the walk). The sunshine is misleading –  the air’s cold, though it warms a little as the afternoon progresses, and it’s very pleasant to be out.

 

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Causeway Wood

We attempted this walk back in October (see Timber!) but had to turn back when we met some “serious-looking forestry operations”. Today there’s no forestry work taking place, and we’re able to complete the circuit of Causeway Wood. That final section (we weren’t certain it existed!) was very pleasant, after the forestry tracks we’d followed – a single-file footpath just within the forest’s edge, with views to the wooded ridge to the east. Worth returning for! Perhaps next time we’ll make an attempt on the summit (no great height, but the undergrowth was overwhelming last time we tried it…)

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Out like a lamb…

The beginning of March wasn’t exactly leonine, though the first couple of days were cold and grey. The last two days look like being warm (by late March standards), calm and sunny. This afternoon was certainly a good one for exploring the quiet uplands of Wenlock Edge, to the north-west of the Munslows. We didn’t meet anyone else on this five mile stroll, but there’s no shortage of sheep – and lambs, of course.

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To Bannister’s and Belswardyne

A (not very) circular route from Sheinton on a beautiful spring day, taking in Bannister’s Coppice, which is open and airy at this time of year, and the fields and woods around Belswardyne Hall. We thought we might see deer, but not today, though their footprints are in abundance. Heading back from Belswardyne, there are very young lambs in the fields and a fine view to the Wrekin.

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