Croft and Bircher

Herefordshire hill country, up towards the Shropshire border (and not far from Wales either)… Days like this are rare in November, so we’re off again, to walk a route we followed a couple of years ago, at the opposite end of the year. Then, we walked through abundant May blossom and bluebells; today there are toadstools and larch needles, and warm autumn shades against a cold blue sky.

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By Coundmoor Brook

It’s hardly a major watercourse, nevertheless it has carved itself a very attractive shallow but steep-sided valley, ideal for an amble on this bright but hazy afternoon. Heading back, our path overlooks the valley, with more extensive views the other way. Am I alone in thinking the Wrekin resembles Mount Fuji from up here?

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Clee Hill and the Three-forked Pole

Sounds like something from the Wild West, doesn’t it? This is England’s “Wild West”, not far from the Welsh border, and it’s quite a strange kind of place. The quarry on Clee Hill is still active, but there are many remains of old workings and their associated buildings and structures. There are more strange and tottering  structures at Magpie Hill – we make our way there via the remarkable three-forked pole, near a place called “Random”.
When we started out, it seemed like a perfect day for an outing, but the weather grew increasingly gloomy as we walked back from Magpie Hill. The first drops of rain fell as we unlocked the car – how’s that for timing?
Cleehill or Clee Hill? One’s the village, the other? Guess!

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